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Congressman Ted Lieu

Representing the 33rd District of California

Energy and Environment

"In California, I was honored to coauthor AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act.  But it’s clear to me that to solve climate change, we need America to do what California has done, and then for America to get other countries to do what California has done.  That’s why my first piece of legislation in Congress was the Climate Solutions Act of 2015: a bold, innovative plan to energize investment in green energy technology, set strong renewable energy standards and slash the carbon pollution that is damaging our planet."

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More on Energy and Environment

September 15, 2016 Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Online at The Hill, Mr. Lieu and Mr. Gallego, Members of Congress and Veterans of the U.S. Military, explain why climate change is a serious threat to America’s national security.

September 14, 2016 In The News

Rep. Lamar Smith argued on Wednesday that not only does his House Science committee have the authority to subpoena two state attorneys general investigating ExxonMobil, but a constitutional obligation to ensure that science isn't being undermined by such investigations.

But while the committee hearing was ostensibly to address the constitutional issues of Smith's subpoenas, it served as a showcase for scholarly disagreements and political divides.

September 14, 2016 In The News

The purpose of the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology has never been less clear than it was on Wednesday, when it held a hearing to deliberate over whether the committee has the authority to subpoena environmental groups and state attorneys general over an ongoing investigation into alleged fraud by Exxon.

The committee’s understanding of the so-called #ExxonKnew investigation seemed to vary significantly.

September 14, 2016 In The News

Who can subpoena who? That’s the issue a House committee and attorneys debated today when it comes to potential climate change-related fraud.

The hearing centered on whether state attorneys general—who have subpoenaed Exxon Mobil Corp. to see if it lied to its investors about how climate change would affect its business—now must respond to House Science, Space and Technology Committee subpoenas into the climate investigation.

September 14, 2016 In The News

We were recently struck by a splashy new Exxon ad campaign designed to show off a surprising side of the oil and gas giant. The ads, which debuted during the Olympics, feature the smiling faces of Exxon scientists and engineers hard at work on algae-based biofuels, energy efficiency, and other tools to fight climate change.

September 14, 2016 Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ICYMI: CONGRESSMAN LIEU PENS OP-ED ON WHY  “CONGRESS SHOULD ASK WHAT EXXON KNEW ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE”

Online today at The Sacramento Bee, Mr. Lieu explains why Congress has an obligation to look out for Americans who are facing the toll of climate change. 

September 14, 2016 In The News

Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas) asserted Wednesday that he has a “constitutional obligation” in his controversial subpoenas of state attorneys general for the climate change-related investigations.

Smith, chairman of the House Science Committee, said at a hearing over the matter that as the House’s lead panel overseeing federal science programs, he is well within his rights and responsibilities.

“The committee has the power to issue these subpoenas and enforce their compliance,” Smith said at the hearing.

September 14, 2016 In The News

EXXON CLIMATE DRAMA REACHES CONGRESS: House Science Committee Chairman Lamar Smith will double down today at a hearing on his bid to subpoena state officials for records of their ongoing investigations into Exxon Mobil’s climate science activities. It's the latest phase in Smith’s quest to transform his once-sleepy committee into an energetic investigator of government activities.

September 14, 2016 In The News

The recovery has just begun in Louisiana as thousands attempt to pick up the pieces from the historic flooding.

It’s the latest, but certainly not the last example of extreme weather events that will increase in frequency and severity due to climate change.

When I watch the news and see homes and businesses wrecked, an angry thought comes to mind. The fossil fuel industry saw it all coming.

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