May 2017

Business Insider: Hackers used a long-neglected vulnerability in phone networks to empty victims' bank accounts

There's a major vulnerability in the way phone networks talk to each other - and hackers have used it to drain victims' bank accounts.

What's more: The issue has been known about for years, and public demonstrations have highlighted the issue, but nothing had been done about it.

Daily Mail: Is your money safe? Bank hack could affect MILLIONS of customers around the world by intercepting two-step login verification codes

It was designed as a security measure to increase protection of internet users across the globe.

But hackers have used a well-known security vulnerability in worldwide mobile telecoms networks to steal access codes to online bank accounts.

The exploit could be used against any bank that uses two-step login verification, as well as high-profile websites like Facebook, Google and many others.

Bank Info Security: Bank Account Hackers Used SS7 to Intercept Security Codes

Hackers have exploited the Signaling System #7 international telecommunications signaling protocol as part of a two-stage attack designed to drain money from people's online bank accounts.

The attacks successfully targeted online bank account holders in Germany by using call-forwarding features built into the SS7 protocol, German daily newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung reports.

SC Magazine: Rep. Lieu calls for SS7 vulnerability to be patched

A U.S. congressman is again calling for the FCC and telecom industry to fix a security flaw in the Signalling System No. 7 (SS7) that is allowing hackers to bypass two-factor authentication and wipe out bank accounts.

The issue was again brought to light when European carrier O2-Telefonica reported that some of its customers had been hit with attacks taking advantage of the SS7 vulnerability resulting in money being removed from their bank accounts.

Washington Post: Democrats, surprised on Obamacare, look to elections to save it

In March, when Republicans pulled a vote on their American Health Care Act, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi took off her shoes and literally jumped for joy.

On Thursday, as Republicans cobbled together the votes to resurrect and pass the bill, Pelosi (D-Calif.) insisted that the sun was still coming out for Democrats — and her party sang an out-of-order goodbye jeer to the opposition.

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